Los Campesinos! – No Blues (2013)

Los Campesinos! has never been a band to take life lying down. Over the course of four albums in as many years, the Welsh band has taken the personal and existential crises facing aimless, terrified twentysomethings and channeled them into manic, occasionally bruising, sugar-rush anthems. Although 2011’s wobbly Hello Sadness suggested the band’s future was

Song of the Week: Army Navy – Crushed Like The Car

In his review of The National’s Trouble Will Find Me, The AV Club’s Josh Modell mused on the band’s songwriting: “at first it seems almost free of hooks, then six listens later it’s difficult to get it unstuck.” That sentence perfectly describes the music of LA power-pop group Army Navy, who are gearing up for their

Listen To This: CHVRCHES – Gun

Another day, another great track from CHVRCHES. Expectations for the Scottish band’s upcoming debut The Bones Of What You Believe have risen and risen with each song they’ve released, which would be dangerous were it not for the fact that they’re now four singles deep and there hasn’t been a clunker yet (not to mention the

The Best Music of 2013 (So Far)

It’s been a bleak year for music. Not “bleak” in the sense that there hasn’t been any good music. On the contrary, 2013 – only halfway through – has already outstripped both 2012 and 2011 in quality of albums (and quantity of those albums, too). I mean “bleak” in the sense that somebody needs to

Song of the Week: Shout Out Louds – Where You Come In

Optica, the fourth LP from Swedish quintet Shout Out Louds, really does deserve its own review: it’s turned out one of the best songs of the year, and the rest of the album is no slouch, either. “Where You Come In” is the type of glimmering, wistful pop the band does so well, a teasingly

Portugal. The Man – Evil Friends (2013)

Portugal. The Man have always been about the singles. While their albums on the whole tend to sag beneath an overdose of psychedelic flourishes, they have consistently churned out great, infectious pop songs like “People Say” and “All My People” that are just off-kilter enough to keep them off the charts. Evil Friends, the oddly-punctuated Portland